Photos from Spirit of Mother Jones Festival Day 3 (3rd August)

Photos from the second day of the 7th Spirit of Mother Jones Festival and Summer School 2018. Today (Saturday, 4th August) is the final day of the festival.  Timetable to be uploaded on this site shortly.

 

Mary Manning presentation with James NOlan

James Nolan of the Cork Mother Jones Committtee presenting the Spirit of Mother Jones award 2018 to former Dunnes Stores striker Mary Manning at the Firkin Crane Theatre in Shandon last evening. The award was jointly made to Mary and the other former Dunnes Stores strikers who maintained their action in opposition to the sale of products from then Apartheid South Africa for almost three years

Dr. Emily Twarog

Dr. Emily Twarog at the Cathedral Visitor Centre

Video: Cork’s own Jimmy Crowley singing one of his own songs about the Spanish Civil War.

 

Jimmy Crowley

Cork’s own troubadour Jimmy Crowley was in fine form at the Spirit of Mother Jones Festival at the Maldron Hotel

Mother Jones Plaque

The Mother Jones Plaque at John Redmond Street. The final event of the festival will take place at this location at 7.30pm this evening (4th August) – the annual Toast and songs to Mother Jones. All welcome

Shandon Bells

St. Ann’s Church of Ireland, Shandon, Cork

Louise Ryan and Ger O'Mahony

Professor Louise Ryan with Ger O’Mahony of the Cork Mother Jones Committee

Mary Manning presentation with committee

Presentation to Mary Manning with members of the Cork Mother Jones Committee

Mother Jones 2018 Day 3 045

Ford’s – “Memories of the Line” – new film by Frameworks Films

Fords – Memories of the Line

Firkin Crane Theatre, Wednesday August 1st 2018 at 7.30pm.

A Documentary by Frameworks Films and Ford Ex-Workers’ Group.

The Fords factory became synonymous with Cork in the sixty seven years in which production was carried on in the Marina plant.

Henry Ford

Henry Ford – photo via US Library of Congress

Henry Ford’s father William had left from Ballinascarthy, in West Cork in “Black 1847”, the worst year of the Irish Great Famine, while his mother Mary Litigot (of Belgian extraction?) was the adopted daughter of Patrick Ahern who was born in 1804 at Fair Lane (now Wolfe Tone Street, on the north side of Cork city). Patrick Ahern had worked as a butcher before joining the British Army and eventually wound up in Michigan, USA. Henry was born in 1863, and he was raised by William and Mary in the Ahern household.

Henry Ford returned to Cork in August 1912 and visited Fair Lane. Later in 1917 he announced the construction of his first factory outside America. The old Cork racecourse on the Marina on the south bank of the River Lee was purchased for £21,000 and was levelled and piled. The new 330,000 sq. foot factory was constructed and began the production of the Fordson tractors on 1st July 1919.

Lord Mayor on Fordson

Lord Mayor of Cork, Tomás MacCurtain, driving a Fordson tractor at the Marina in early 1920. (Photo via Fair Lane / Ford)

By 1922, some 1600 men were employed. Later as Motel Ts were manufactured along with tractors and the final Model T in the world was completed there in December 1928. The payroll quadrupled to 6700 until the impact of the Great Depression in the early 30s when there were mass layoffs. Thousands of former Cork production workers headed for the new Ford truck plant

in Dagenham, Essex in the UK.

The factory worked on through the Second World War, unions were finally fully recognised by Ford’s in Cork in the early 50s, and wages were higher than most other employments. The Cork factory produced all the other main Ford vehicles including the Model A, Model BF and Model Y; Prefect; Anglia; Escort; Cortina; and Sierra.

Ford workers Cork

Ford workers at the Cork plant. (Photo courtesy of Bill Daly)

By then, the production/assembly line originally invented by Ransom E Olds and first implemented by Henry Ford in 1913 used in Cork from the start. “This “brave new world” of automation was inviolable, the throbbing heart of a never ending machine, the smells of different processes, the sounds of industry, yet it had to keep moving, it must never stop, the vehicles, slowly taking shape and shuffling forward in a never ending line until each new vehicle rolled off the production line”

Ford Prefect 1950s

Another car rolling off the Cork production line early 1950s

The daily working lives of thousands of men were dictated by the constant movement of the line, repetitive jobs, the systematic deskilling of many men, the daily deadening grind, the original time and motion study. Time was measured by passed hours and the number of jobs completed on the vehicles as they passed through the various work stations in slow motion or with alarming pace depending on one’s job and mind.  Work was constant, hum drum, tough, and some jobs on the line were particularly difficult.

However many memories of working relate to the comradeship, the craic, the chat, the banter, the ongoing and never ending Cork slagging. Tea-breaks, lunches, the endless sports discussions, soccer, hurling and the pints with colleagues at week-ends. Ford paid well and the community of workers and work had its own distinctive rhythm.

Ford's Marina worker

Checking the engine of a new Ford Cortina at the Marina Plant

Fordsons soccer team, (the “Tractor Boys”) popularised association football in Cork in the early 1920s, the team was the first club from Cork to play in the League of Ireland in 1924 and won the Free State Cup in 1926. The club’s pitch was located at Pic Du Jer Park in Ballinlough which was owned by Ford.

Thousands of Corkonians passed through the Marina plant, in its blue and white colours, many families had several members working and the thronged mass of workers walking up and down Centre Park Road at clocking on/off times bore testament to the world of assembly work.

But time caught up with Fords and sentiment, the final impact of closure in 1984 left a deep wound on the people of Cork. Now former workers have come together to tell their own story of working in Fords.

Fords – Memories of the Line provides a fascinating insight into a Cork institution by those who worked on the line and is a must see for those who worked at Ford’s or have family members who worked on the Marina.

 

 

 

Films at the Spirit of Mother Jones Festival 2018

Films at the

Spirit of Mother Jones Festival 2018

Wednesday 1st August –Saturday 4th August 2018

Admission is free and all are welcome.

Wednesday 1st August

 

Cathedral Visitor Centre, 2.30: “Mother Jones, America’s Most Dangerous Woman” a film by Rosemary Feurer and Laura Vazquez.

             

Mother Jones: America’s Most Dangerous Woman is a documentary about the amazing labor heroine, Mary Harris Jones, known as Mother Jones. Mother Jones’ organising career influenced the history of early 20th century United States. She overcame class and gender limitations to shape an identity that allowed her to become an effective labor organiser in the early 20th century. Mother Jones transformed personal and political grief and rage about class injustices into an effective persona that led workers into battles that changed the course of history. The terrible conditions and labor oppression of the time motivated her to traverse the country, in order to organise against injustices. This film also gives a deeply moving account of the Ludlow Massacre.

www.motherjonesmuseum.org

Release Date:  2007 (Canada).                   Runtime: 24 minutes

=======================

Wednesday 1st August. 

 

Cathedral Visitor Centre 2.50 pm “Mother Jones and her Children” a film by Frameworks Films and the Cork Mother Jones Committee.

 

This film tells the story of Mary Harris (1837 – 1930) from Cork who went on to become known “the most dangerous woman in America”. Starting with her early years in Cork, this documentary goes on to detail her life in America following the famine, her marriage to George Jones and the birth of her four children. It details the tragedies which befell her. Her growing involvement in the labour movement in America, defending the rights of children and workers is documented. Through interviews with leading experts on Mother Jones, we learn of her fearless and tireless campaign to organise workers at a time of severe labour strife and her international legacy today.

 

www.frameworksfilm.com and http://www.motherjonescork.com

 

Release Date:  July 2014.                                 Runtime: 52 min

 

 ======================

 

 

Wednesday 1st August

 

Firkin Crane Theatre 7.30 pm

 

“Fords – Memories of the Line”. A documentary produced by Frameworks Films and the Ford Ex-workers’ Group. Irish Premiere.

 

Frameworks

Emma Bowell and Eddie Noonan of Frameworks Films

Fords – Memories of the Line’ is a documentary about what is was like to work on the assembly line at Ford’s car manufacturing plant in Cork, which operated from 1917 to 1984. Much as the workers built the cars on the assembly line, a group of former workers build a picture, piece by piece, memory by memory, of life on the line. 2017 marked the centenary of the foundation of the factory in Cork and in this documentary, it is the men who built the cars, rather than the man who founded the factory, Henry Ford, who are celebrated, although his role too is acknowledged. Finally the documentary details the final closure of the factory on 13th July 1984 and the impact this had on the men, their families and the city of Cork. Over 800 workers lost their jobs with the closure.

This documentary as told by the former Ford workers should not be missed by anyone who worked in the factory on the Marina or their family members.

www.frameworksfilms.com

Release Date: 2018                                                     Runtime: 60 minutes

 

 ======================

 

Thursday 2nd August.

 

Firkin Crane Theatre 6.00 pm “Up to the last Drop – The Secret Water Wars of Europe.”

A documentary by Yorgos Avgeropoulos. Produced by Small Planet Productions. Co – produced by ARTE GEIE (France), ERT (Greece), KG Productions (France).

This timely documentary poses a central question: Is water for the European Union a commercial product or a human right?

As Europe is going through a crisis that is not solely economical, millions of European citizens demand a response to a crucial question: is water for the European Union a commercial product or a human right? Until today, the European Institutions have not given a clear answer. The EU has still to recognize water as a human right, as the UN did in 2010.

At the same time, cities, regions and countries all around the world are increasingly rejecting the water privatisation model they had adopted for years and are municipalising services in order to take back public control over water and sanitation management.

In Europe, the majority of the cases have been recorded in France, home of the most powerful and influential private water multinational companies of the planet. Nine cases have been recorded in Germany.

Although Berlin and Paris have recently taken back public control over their water services, the financial and political European elites are demanding from Greece, Portugal and Ireland to privatise their public water systems. Provisions about water can be found in every bailout agreement, which Greece, Ireland and Portugal have signed with the Troika signed between the debt-ridden countries and their lenders.

Up To The Last Drop follows the money and the corporate interests during a period of four years in thirteen cities of six EU countries. It’s a documentary film about water that reflects contemporary European values and the quality of the current European democracy.

 

Website: http://www.uptothelastdrop.com

 

Release Date:  2017                                    Runtime: 58 minutes

 

 =========================

 

Saturday 4th August

 

Firkin Crane Theatre 5pm.

 

“PRIDE”

 

Presented in association with the Quay Co-op and in conjunction with Cork LGBT + Pride Week.

 

In memory of Mark Ashton.

 

Pride was produced by the BBC Films and directed by Matthew Warchus.

This film is a true story of solidarity between an improbable alliance of Gay-rights activists known as the LGSM, (Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners) based in London and the striking miners from the Dulais Valley in South Wales.

The year is 1984 and the miners, led by Arthur Scargill, are on strike across most of Britain. The proud mining communities are suffering from the draconian actions imposed by the Margaret Thatcher led government and Tory press which have vowed to crush them.

The frisson and bonds between the gay rights activists and the mining community are portrayed with an accuracy, sensitivity and an edge rarely captured on film. It is an emotional journey for anyone who has ever felt marginalized and the final scenes are simply unforgettable. Pride, which portrays actual events and real people will renew people’s faith in basic solidarity and its legacy will endure.

Release Date: 2014                    Runtime: 2 hours.

 

Spirit of Mother Jones Festival – Day Three (Thursday, 3rd August)

Timetable for Day Three of the Spirit of Mother Jones Festival – Thursday, 3rd August 2017.

There is an environmental theme to today’s events which begin at 11.00am with what promises to be an interesting and topical talk by Councillor Marcia D’Alton on “The Environmental Battle for Cork Harbour”.

We will have Music at the Maldron Hotel at 1.00pm and at 2.30pm at the Firkin Crane we will be showing the thought-provoking documentary “A Plastic Ocean” by Australian journalist and film-maker Craig Leeson.

at 7.30pm we will have a lecture at the Maldron entitled “Climate Change – Our Response” by Fr. Sean McDonagh who has written extensively on environmental issues and is currently President of An Taisce.

All are welcome.

Films at the Spirit of Mother Jones Festival 2017

Films at the Spirit of Mother Jones Festival 2017

Tuesday 1st August –Saturday 5th August 2017

Admission is free and all are welcome.

 

Tuesday 1st August 

Maldron Hotel, Shandon 2.30: “Mother Jones, America’s Most Dangerous Woman” a film by Rosemary Feurer and Laura Vazquez.

             

Mother Jones: America’s Most Dangerous Woman is a documentary about the amazing labor heroine, Mary Harris Jones, known as Mother Jones. Mother Jones’ organising career influenced the history of early 20th century United States. She overcame class and gender limitations to shape an identity that allowed her to become an effective labor organiser in the early 20th century. Mother Jones transformed personal and political grief and rage about class injustices into an effective persona that led workers into battles that changed the course of history. The terrible conditions and labor oppression of the time motivated her to traverse the country, in order to organise against injustices. Also gives a deeply moving account of the Ludlow Massacre.

www.motherjonesmuseum.org

Release Date:  2007 (Canada).                   Runtime: 24 min

Tuesday 1st August. 

Maldron Hotel 4.00 pm “Mother Jones and her Children” a film by Frameworks Films and the Cork Mother Jones Committee.

This film tells the story of Mary Harris (1837 – 1930) from Cork who went on to become “the most dangerous woman in America”. Starting with her early years in Cork, this documentary goes on to detail her life in America following the famine, her marriage to George Jones and the birth of her four children. It details the tragedies which befell her. Her growing involvement in the labour movement in America, defending the rights of children and workers is documented. Through interviews with leading experts on Mother Jones, we learn of her fearless and tireless campaign to organize workers at a time of severe labour strife and her international legacy today.

www.frameworksfilm.com and http://www.motherjonescork.com

 

Release Date:  July 2014.                                 Runtime: 52 min

 

 

Wednesday 2nd August

 

Maldron Hotel 11.am “Ludlow: Greek Americans in the Colorado Coal War.

(Irish public Premiere)

The documentary narrates the story of Greek immigrants at the beginning of the last century, who ended up in distant Colorado working under inhuman conditions in the coal mines of Rockefeller and his fellow mine owners, and who together with immigrants from 22 other countries revolted and wrote a proud page of American labor history, known as the Colorado Coal War of 1913-14.

It is a story not often mentioned in history books, but alive in the memory of the children and the grandchildren of the men who fought for their life and dignity.  They recount their family history with pride and anger in their voice, pride for their forefathers and anger for the injustices they were faced with.

The makers collected the evidence – photos, videos, newspaper articles, songs – to create an engrossing and informative documentary that keeps the viewer’s interest alive from start to finish.  Under the guidance of director Leonidas Vardaros, the team, consisting of cinematographer Prokopis Dafnos, editor Xenofon Vardaros, sound engineer Andreas Gkovas, researcher Frosso Tsouka and narrator Rigas Axelos, gave their best in this truly collective effort.   The production management was carried out by the members of “Apostolis Berdebes” non-profit, Stefanos Plakas, Frosso Tsouka, and Lina Gousiou. Contact www.ludlow.gr

 

Release Date: March 2016 Greece        Runtime: 71 minutes.

 

Wednesday 2nd August.

The Firkin Theatre 2.30.  “Blood on the Mountain.” A film produced by Mari-Lynn Evans, Deborah Wallace and Jordan Freeman.

The film is a searing investigation into the economic and environmental injustices that have resulted from industrial control in West Virginia. This feature documentary details the struggles of a hard‐working, often misunderstood people, who have historically faced limited choices and have never benefited fairly from the rich, natural resources of their land.

 

Blood On The Mountain delivers a striking portrait of a fractured population, exploited and besieged by corporate interests, and abandoned by the powers elected to represent them. Appalachia is a place of great contradictions.

The beauty of the oldest mountain range in North America, with lush, old growth forests, small towns and isolated communities, is juxtaposed with long‐term poverty, out-migration, lack of health care, inadequate educational systems, and political corruption. The coal, timber, oil, and gas have generated billions of dollars, but these huge profits went to companies in other states, leaving the region destitute.

Appalachian counties are left with little or no tax base to help fund schools, health care, or job creation. Entrenched, corrupt local governments and lagging public policy have not generated sustainable economic alternatives in the region. It is a cruel irony that a region so rich in natural resources is home to many of the poorest people in the United States.

www.bloodonthemountain.com

 

Release date: 18th November 2016.                             Runtime: 93 minutes.

 

Thursday 3rd August

 

The Firkin Theatre 2.30 “A Plastic Ocean” a film from the Plastic Ocean Foundation.

Irish Premiere.

A Plastic Ocean is an epic global adventure following a documentary filmmaker and a world record free-diver as they travel the earth discovering the shocking impact plastic is having on our oceans and the marine animals that live there. The film investigates how our addiction to plastic is impacting the food chain and how that is effecting every one of us through new and developing human health problems. The expedition leads the two adventurers to unusual scientific discoveries, heart-breaking truths and important solutions to one of the biggest problems confronting mankind.

Thirty miles from land, off the southern coast of Sri Lanka, where civil war has kept the oceans and beaches pristine, a global expedition led by documentary filmmaker Craig Leeson is searching for one of the world’s most elusive animals. Blue whales are on the edge of extinction but what the expeditioners find in these remote waters proves heart breaking.

The shock of finding vast quantities of floating plastic in this pristine location forces the filmmaker to think: if plastic is lurking in this remote pristine area what is happening in oceans around the globe?

So begins a global odyssey to find the answer to this question. Teams of scientists from around the world are engaged to analyze and report on the expedition’s findings as the filmmakers embark on a discovery that reveals the consequences of our disposable lifestyle. The results will astound viewers –just as it did our adventurers – who capture never-before-seen images of marine life, plastic pollution, and its ultimate consequences for human health.

One does not easily forget some of the images in this stunning film.

A Plastic Ocean is filmed in 20 locations around the world in beautiful and chilling detail to document the global effects of plastic pollution and introduce workable technology and policy solutions that can, if implemented, begin to change one of mankind’s most destructive inventions. Plastic is indestructible and this year we will manufacture 300 million tonnes of it, half of which will be used just once before being discarded. We can no longer afford to treat plastic as disposable. But can we change our lifestyles in time to save our world and ourselves?

Directed by Craig Leeson.

Produced by Jo Ruxton and Adam Leipzig.

www.plasticoceans.org

Release Date: 22nd September 2016        Runtime: 102 minutes.

 

Friday 4th August

The Firkin Theatre 7.30 “The Limerick Brigadistas – From the Shannon to the Ebro”, a film by the Limerick International Brigades Memorial Trust (LIBMT) and Frameworks Films.

Cork Premiere.

The Limerick Brigadistas-From the Shannon to the Ebro tells the story of six men from Limerick who went to Fight Fascism in the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939). About 240 volunteers fought with the International Brigades during the war and this documentary depicts the lives of the six men from Limerick who fought with the XV International Brigade – Maurice Emmett Ryan, Jim Woulfe, Frank Ryan, Gerard Doyle, Paddy Brady and Joe Ryan.

 

It explores what motivated these men to leave Ireland and to fight in another country and what became of them subsequently. The documentary follows the members of the Limerick International Brigades Trust as they travel to Spain to find the final resting place of some of their fellow Limerick men and to examine the relevance of their story in today’s world. The documentary was produced by Frameworks Films and the Limerick International Brigades Memorial Trust.

Best remembered is Frank Ryan, born in Elton, near Knocklong in Co Limerick, he spent from 1916 to 1921 in St Colman’s College, Fermoy. Ryan led some 80 volunteers from Ireland to Spain in 1936, he was wounded in March 1937, recovered in Ireland but returned to Spain and was captured in March 1938. He endured the savagery of Franco’s prison camps before eventually turning up in Germany. Ryan died in Germany in June 1944, his story is among those told in the new documentary.

See www.facebook.com/libmt and www.frameworksfilms.com

The film will be introduced by Ger McCloskey PRO LIBMT and Eddie Noonan/Emma Bowell of Frameworks Films.

 

Release Date: April 7th 2017     Runtime: 80 minutes

 

Saturday 5th August 2017

 

Maldron Hotel 5pm. Film “The Mine Wars” a film produced and directed by Randal MacLowry.

 

A production of the Film Posse for American Experience (WGBH-Boston)

The Mine Wars explores the largely forgotten story of the epic struggle between Capital and Labour over the recognition of the United Mine workers of America union in the coalfields of South West Virginia. These culminated in the largest civil insurrection in America since the Civil War at Blair Mountain where thousands of miners took up arms and were even bombed from the air.

Between 1890 and 1912, miners in West Virginia endured the highest death rate in America. Mother Jones was active in 1902 and again in the period 1912-1913 when Paint Creek and Cabin Creek featured. Later Mingo County, Logan County, the Matewan Massacre and the Battle of Blair Mountain where at least 50 people were killed are highlighted. This film concentrates on a UMWA leader and former miner Frank Keeney, who inspired by Mother Jones went to organise West Virginia. Some of its images give a haunting impression of this bleak period and depicts the labour landscape where Mother Jones organised. One can really appreciate the amazing work and resilience of Mother Jones as the film proceeds.

Mother Jones, herself incarcerated for three months in West Virginia, described the state as “Medieval West Virginia with its tent colonies on the bleak hills! With its grim men and women! When I get to the other side, I shall tell God almighty about West Virginia.”  The Mine Wars tells the story on this side!

Produced and directed by Randall MacLowry.

See The Film Posse Facebook. www.pbs.org

 

Release Date: 2016     Runtime: 120 min

Frank Ryan and the Limerick Brigadistas

Spain

On site with the film crew Angelo Vernuccio, (Sound Man) Ger McCloskey, Eddie Noonan,(Frameworks Films) Tom Collopy and Alan Warren.

The Cork Mother Jones Committee will show the Cork premiere of TheLimerick Brigadistas – From the Shannon to the Ebro…a film documentary by the Limerick International Brigades Memorial Trust (LIBMT) and Frameworks Films on Friday 4th August at 7.30 at the Firkin Theatre in Shandon on Cork’s Northside.  All are welcome.

LIBMT logo

Logo of the Limerick International Brigades Memorial Trust (LIBMT)

The Limerick Brigadistas – From the Shannon to the Ebro’ tells the story of six men from Limerick who went to fight fascism in the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939).  Approximately 240 Irish volunteers fought with the International Brigades during the war and the documentary depicts the lives of the six men from Limerick who fought with the XV International Brigade – Maurice Emmett Ryan, Jim Woulfe, Frank Ryan, Gerard Doyle, Paddy Brady and Joe Ryan. 

It explores what motivated these men to leave Ireland to fight in another country and what subsequently happened to them. The documentary follows members of the Limerick International Brigades Memorial Trust as they travel to Spain to find the final resting place of some of their fellow Limerick men and to look at the relevance of their story in today’s world. The documentary was produced by Frameworks Films and the Limerick International Brigades Memorial Trust. 

Ger McCloskey, Emma Gilleece, Tom Collopy of the Limerick International Brigades Memorial Trust

Frank Ryan

Frank Ryan

Best remembered is Frank Ryan, born in Elton, near Knocklong in Co Limerick on 11th September, he spent from 1916 to 1921 at St Colman’s College, Fermoy. Ryan led some 80 volunteers from Ireland to Spain in 1936, he was wounded in March 1937, recovered in Ireland but returned to Spain where he was captured in March 1938. He endured Franco’s prison camps before eventually arriving in Germany. He died in Dresden,Germany in June 1944. His story in Spain is told in this documentary.

 

 

 

On location

Documentary reenactors on location including Alan Warren

“A Plastic Ocean” at the Spirit of Mother Jones Festival and Summer School 2017.

plastic pollution at sea

Plastic Ocean – floating plastic

The Cork Mother Jones Committee will screen the stunning environmental film “A Plastic Ocean” at the sixth Spirit of Mother Jones festival on Thursday afternoon 3rd August 2017 at the Firkin Theatre in Shandon. While many regard tackling climate change as being vital to the survival of the planet, other threats are also accumulating in the environment.

This film investigates how the world’s increasing addiction to plastic is impacting the food chain and how that is effecting every one of us through new and developing human health problems. The results will astound viewers as the film captures never-before-seen images of marine life under threat from plastics.

A Plastic Ocean – film poster

A Plastic Ocean is filmed in 20 locations around the world and documents in chilling detail the effects of the some 8 million tons of plastic which we dump in the world’s oceans annually. Each year some 300 million tons of plastic are manufactured in the world, half of which we use just once before we dump it, making it one of mankind’s most destructive inventions.

The film follows documentary film maker Craig Leeson and a free diver Tanya Streeter, who while filming the blue whale, discover huge quantities of plastic floating in the waters off Sri Lanka. What follows is a global odyssey to discover what is happening in the oceans around the world.

Taking four years to film, and costing some $3.5 million the results should force people to question the plastic pathway and urge industry and all of us users to seek safe alternative solutions.

The evidence of plastic pollution which the film makers found shocked them and made them question a world where plastic is everywhere, yet few question why we produce so much, use so much and where it goes when discarded. The build-up of micro plastics and the creation of ocean garbage patches places the viability of the world’s oceans to sustain life under huge pressure.

Tanya Streeter

Tanya Streeter on the island of Tuvalu

The ratio of plastic to plankton in the Mediterranean Sea is 1:2, in some places the small plastic particles outnumber plankton by a ratio of 26:1.  A large amount of discarded plastic carries toxic chemicals such as BPA, phthalates, pesticides and PCBs. Over 90% of seabirds worldwide have plastic pieces in their stomachs. If this trend continues, and with studies showing that plastic is entering the food chains, then what is the future for human health and our very planet?

Plastics are created from the oil hydrocarbons and one solution would be to return plastics to oil. The search for bacteria to break plastic molecules down continues but the oceans or indeed the earth are not able to do so.  Some proposed solutions such as incineration create many toxic and poisonous emissions to the environment. Have the plastic manufacturers any real answers to safeguarding the environment from their products?

Oil Rigs

Oil – leaves lasting damage

Plastic Oceans is a global network of independent not for profits and charitable organisations, united in their aim to change the world’s attitude towards plastic within a generation.

“A Plastic Ocean” will be screened on Thursday afternoon 3rd August at the Firkin Theatre in Shandon as a contribution to an “Environment Day” at the Spirit of Mother Jones festival. Discussion to follow. All are welcome. Further lectures on environmental issues will be announced shortly.

New film “Blood on the Mountain” will feature at the Spirit of Mother Jones Festival 2017

Blood on the Mountain

Blood on the Mountain movie poster

Blood on the Mountain is a newly released award-winning documentary.  It  is a fearless look at the 150 year history of the US coal industry. It has been endorsed by both the United Mine Workers of America and Sierra Club.   This is a story of human struggles endured at the mercy of unregulated industries and corrupt politicians.
The film’s director is Mari-lynn Evans who is “a life-long fan of Mother Jones.” She faced terrific obstacles and efforts to stop the film from the coal industry, which “reminded me of what Mother Jones and activists 100 years ago had to face.”
The film, she notes, “is a story of human struggles endured at the mercy of unregulated industries and corrupt politicians,” that should interest people far beyond West Virginia: “The injustices to the workers, environment and communities in the coalfields of Appalachia are the “canary in a coal mine” illustrating to all Americans what happens when corporations are allowed absolute control to inflict atrocities and politicians abdicate responsibility for those they are elected to protect.”

The film is showing at the Mother Jones Museum & Heritage Project Newsletter

May Day Special at the Mother Jones Museum at Mount Olive, Illinois on 29th April.  We are delighted to announce that we will also be showing the film for the first time in Ireland at the 2017 Spirit of Mother Jones in Cork which runs from 1st to 5th August in the Shandon area of the city – further information coming soon when the 2017 Festival Programme is available.
For further information on the Mother Jones events in Illinois visit it the Mother Jones Lives! page on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/MotherJonesLives/

August 1st – Mother Jones Day

Days Posters 2016_Page_5

Today, 1st August, is Mother Jones Day in Cork and it is also the final day of the Spirit of Mother Jones Festival 2016.

There are just three events on today’s programme all of which will be held at the Maldron Hotel, Shandon.  We start at 4.00pm with a showing of Tadhg Barry Remembered – the story of trade unionist, socialist and Irish republican Alderman Tadhg Barry who was shot dead by a sentry at Ballykinlar prison camp in November 1921, just hours before he was due to be released.  The documentary was made by Cork based Frameworks Films.

At 6.00pm we show The Spirit of Mother Jones Festivals Highlights 2012-2015 which features some of the memorable moments of the first four years of the festival. Our thanks to Frameworks Films who have recorded a huge amount of material at the festival since 2012 and who have similarly created a repository of film recording Cork’s present and recent past which we are certain will become a huge resource for this city.

At 7.30pm Bandon born author and award winning journalist Justine McCarthy will deliver a lecture on “Greed is Good for Nothing”.

 

All of today’s events are at the Maldron Hotel, John Redmond Street in the Shandon area of Cork and are completely free.

Day 3 at the Spirit of Mother Jones Festival

Days Posters 2016_Page_3

Today is the 3rd day of the 2016 Spirit of Mother Jones festival in Cork.  The first two days have been most interesting and have attracted large crowds including a number of international guests.

Today’s events begin at 11.30am with local historian Luke Dineen who will talk about the 1922 Post Office strike which was the first major industrial dispute in the history of the state.

At 2.30pm we have Anne Twomey of Blackpool Historical Society who will tell the story of the Wallace Sisters.

At 4.00pm we will show Yvette Vanson’s documentary The Battle for Orgreave which deals with the disturbing events at Orgreave during the UK Miner’s Strike. Pat Egan of Unite, the Union, himself a former miner will talk about the events.  We will include here a tribute to Dave Hopper, General Secretary of the Durham Miner’s Association who was due to speak again at this year’s festival but died suddenly earlier this month.

At 7.00pm Randall MacLowry’s film The Mine Wars will be shown. This tells the story of the West Virginia mine wars of the early years of the 20th century in which Mother Jones herself championed the rights of the miners and their.

To finish off the day, at 9.00pm a musical treat is in store with John Nyhan, Mick Treacy and Friends who will perform and sing “Songs of the Mining Tradition.

The festival continues until Monday evening, 1st August – Mother Jones Day.